Waen Shepherd 

LIFE

DRAB NOTATIONS FROM A MUNDANE EXISTENCE
Waen Shepherd
THE MUNDANITY EXHIBITION - EXHIBIT II: TRAIN TICKET TO YORK, Oct 23rd 1989
A train ticket from Pontefract to York, which is obviously where I decided to go for a posh day out on my 18th birthday. But I didn’t actually live in Pontefract at the time, so I obviously decided to go there too. I did go to school in Pontefract (would have been in the sixth form at the time), but the likelihood is it wasn’t actually a school day (my birthday usually fell in the half term holiday). Other deeply interesting notes: There are three stations in Pontefract and no indication which one this is British Rail only existed for another decade at most, as it was gradually sold off from 1994 onwards In the 1980s, we were collectively told that one of the main benefits of privatisation would be more competitive pricing. So it shouldn’t escape anyone’s attention that the price on this ticket of a Cheapday Return from Pontefract to York at the end of the 1980s was £4.20. The cheapest single ticket today (June 2020) appears to be £17.20, over four times higher. Note that’s a single ticket - a return would cost twice the price at £34.40. So the price of a train journey in the North of England is eight times higher than it would have been in 1989 Having said that, rome2rio.com reckons I can do it for as little as £8 each way if I purchase the tickets for each stage of the journey separately, which is only about 4 times higher. But it’s still four times higher Of course, you’d expect prices to be four times higher after thirty years anyway, wouldn’t you? What with inflation and that? Well, according to the Bank of England’s Inflation Calculator, £4 from 1989 would cost you £10.03 in today’s money. Which is about two and a half times. So the very best you can say is that privatisation has doubled the cost in real terms for rail passengers Compare that with the prices at Tesco, which have more or less stayed the same
WHO THE HELL IS HE? A brief biography which will be either enlightening  or useless, depending on whether you’re looking  at this site on a desktop or a mobile FOLLOW ME ON TWITTER To see hilaaarious tweets like this one, about the  time I saw a tag for The Blood Wolf Gang on a  fence post! You just had to be there!
FURTHER EXPLORATIONS IN MUNDANITY
Waen Shepherd 

LIFE

DRAB NOTATIONS FROM A MUNDANE EXISTENCE
THE MUNDANITY EXHIBITION - EXHIBIT II: TRAIN TICKET, Oct 23rd 1989
WHO THE HELL IS HE? A brief biography which will be either enlightening  or useless, depending on whether you’re looking  at this site on a desktop or a mobile FOLLOW ME ON TWITTER To see hilaaarious tweets like this one, about the  time I saw a tag for The Blood Wolf Gang on a  fence post! You just had to be there!
FURTHER EXPLORATIONS IN MUNDANITY
A train ticket from Pontefract to York, which is obviously where I decided to go for a posh day out on my 18th birthday. But I didn’t actually live in Pontefract at the time, so I obviously decided to go there too. I did go to school in Pontefract (would have been in the sixth form at the time), but the likelihood is it wasn’t actually a school day (my birthday usually fell in the half term holiday). Other deeply interesting notes: There are three stations in Pontefract and no indication which one this is British Rail only existed for another decade at most, as it was gradually sold off from 1994 onwards In the 1980s, we were collectively told that one of the main benefits of privatisation would be more competitive pricing. So it shouldn’t escape anyone’s attention that the price on this ticket of a Cheapday Return from Pontefract to York at the end of the 1980s was £4.20. The cheapest single ticket today (June 2020) appears to be £17.20, over four times higher. Note that’s a single ticket - a return would cost twice the price at £34.40. So the price of a train journey in the North of England is eight times higher than it would have been in 1989 Having said that, rome2rio.com reckons I can do it for as little as £8 each way if I purchase the tickets for each stage of the journey separately, which is only about 4 times higher. But it’s still four times higher Of course, you’d expect prices to be four times higher after thirty years anyway, wouldn’t you? What with inflation and that? Well, according to the Bank of England’s Inflation Calculator, £4 from 1989 would cost you £10.03 in today’s money. Which is about two and a half times. So the very best you can say is that privatisation has doubled the cost in real terms for rail passengers Compare that with the prices at Tesco, which have more or less stayed the same
Waen Shepherd